Hanni El Khatib

Red Bull Sound Select Presents

Hanni El Khatib

Dude York, Pinky Pinky

Thu, February 9, 2017

Doors: 8:00 pm / Show: 9:00 pm

$3.00 w/ RSVP - $10.00 without RSVP

This event is all ages

Official ID required for those who are 16+.

Anyone under the age of 16 must be accompanied by a parent or guardian.

Hanni El Khatib
Hanni El Khatib
Hanni El Khatib's first idea for his Savage Times project was to do something he'd never done before. Instead, he ended up doing … well, everything he'd never done before. He'd be playing new instruments, writing in unfamiliar new ways, opening himself up to an unrelenting stream of ideas and dedicating himself totally to pure musical instinct—and then releasing songs instantly to the public, without waiting to tour or assemble an album or anything. At the end of 2015, he'd walked into the studio with his guitar and a few lines of lyrics, hoping to sketch out a track or two just to stay busy, but that very first day he walked out with two finished songs and the inspiration to create something raw in real time, recording and releasing songs (and even videos!) direct to the public as soon as tape stopped rolling: "Everything was really as I did it," he says. "It was meant to be an experiment in how I could write and record and release something as quickly as possible. I didn't wanna make an album—I wanted to put songs out every week. It's personal for me."


El Khatib started Savage Times last December, after the Bataclan attacks forced the cancellation of a planned Paris performance. With unexpected time on his hands—and unexpected ideas on his mind—he'd scheduled open-ended studio time at Crystal Antlers frontman-turned-producer Jonny Bell's Jazzcats studio. Each day, he'd take the hour-long drive through L.A.'s industrial corridor to Long Beach, sketching out riffs and lyrics as he drove. (The Suicide-meets-Italo-disco burner "Born Brown" came suddenly while in traffic, and he started screaming the words as loud as he could so his voice would be the perfect amount of wrecked.)
If he felt like making an solo electric guitar song, he'd do it—like the one-take from-the-heart "Miracle." If he wanted to compose on piano for the first time ever, he would, and that's how he ended up with the shimmering soul-searching "Gun Clap Hero." And if he wanted to resurrect old-school studio pro techniques like charting music for a string section or hiring a trio of singers for backup vocals, he'd do that, too. For seven months and fifty songs, he'd work with Bell to capture, strengthen and grow that morning's burst of inspiration, celebrating at Long Beach's oldest bar—or with the studio's resident cats and chicken—once the fifteen-hour work day was done. For a grand finale, he wrote and cut the scorching "Mondo and His Make-Up," a nod to the supercharged guitar-garage he made his name on, and after some precise editing, the Savage Times experiment was done.


And the result? 21 best-of-the-sessions songs, destined for vinyl release as a 10" box set, as well as the kind of creative revelations that only happen when you quit looking around and start looking ahead. Originally, he'd hoped to explode the lingering idea that he was simply a blues-rock guitar player, left over from his first single and his work with the Black Keys' Dan Auerbach: that's why Savage Timestouches everything from garage rock to punk to disco, hip-hop and even some unexpected solo-guitar self-portraiture. But on the way, he also exploded his own idea of what he could do—even maybe who he was, or would be. Savage Times was an experiment, but an experience, too.


"I realized that if I want, I can play everything," he says. "Or if I don't wanna play guitar or make a straight-forward rock song, I don't have to, and it'll still sound like me. It opened my eyes to how I can sound like myself over whatever backdrop I want. That's not important. What's holding it together is my point of view as a musician. What surprised me is how self-sufficient I can be. You realize you don't need all the things people tell you that you need to make great records. You need good gear and good people—that's it! And you don't need much more."
Dude York
Dude York's Sincerely opens with a blast—the massive opening chords of "Black Jack," a squealing track that blends the swagger of glam with the heavy riffing and ringing hooks of arena rock. The Seattle-based trio—Peter Richards on guitar and vocals, Claire England on bass and vocals, and Andrew Hall on drums—is announcing itself with an album that couches its themes of anxiety and eroding mental health in rock tracks that amp up the sweetly melodic crunch of powerpop with massive distortion and bashed-to-heck drums. Sincerely is a loud, sweaty rebuke to those moments in life when it seems like nothing's working, a testament to the power of friendship, staring problems directly in the face, and finding solace in art.

Richards, England, and Hall have been through a lot during their four years of playing together, and tracks like the speedy, dark "Paralyzed," the Creedence-echoing "Twin Moons," and the frustrated yet ebullient "Something in The Way" combines lyrics that play on the trio's travails with jumpy, riff-heavy distorto-pop. England handles lead vocal duties on the zinging kiss-off "Tonight" and the slowly grinding "Love Is," the first time she's done so on a Dude York record. "Times Not on My Side," an intimate farewell note sung atop jangling acoustic, caps the album.

A first pass at a home-recorded version of Sincerely led to the band being told that there was "drywall in every piece of [the record]," says Hall, and they had to go back to the drawing board. Longtime Sleater-Kinney and Bikini Kill producer John Goodmanson and JR Slayer (aka The Blood Brothers' Cody Votolato) helped Dude York craft a record that captured the energy of their live show while finding new ways to expand upon its ideas.

The band's thoughtful approach to putting together Sincerely's songs echoes the album's overarching themes of almost-punishing inward focus.

"I feel like it's about losing perspective—a spiraling-inward perspective despite what may be ready support networks around you," adds Richards. "It's like, 'I don't need anybody's help. I should be able to do this myself, because it's just, like, living.'"

Bringing England's straightforward drawl into the mix underscores that idea, and its contrast to Richards' excited yelp heightens the tension on Sincerely, a chaotic, yet ultimately triumphant album that's a vital tonic for these increasingly confused times.

"Your back's against the wall," says Richards, "so all you can do is fight."
Venue Information:
The Teragram Ballroom
1234 West 7th Street
Los Angeles, CA, 90017
http://www.teragramballroom.com/