Mandolin Orange

Mandolin Orange

Rachel Baiman

Wed, November 15, 2017

Doors: 8:00 pm / Show: 9:00 pm

$22 advance / $25 day of show

This event is all ages

Mandolin Orange
Mandolin Orange
Lean in to Mandolin Orange's new album, "Blindfaller," and it's bound to happen. You'll suddenly pick up on the power and devastation lurking in its quietude, the doom hiding beneath its unvarnished beauty. You'll hear the way it magnifies the intimacy at the heart of the North Carolina duo's music, as if they created their own musical language as they recorded it.

Due Sept. 30 on Yep Roc Records, "Blindfaller" builds on the acclaim of Mandolin Orange's breakthrough debut on the label, 2013's "This Side of Jordan," and its follow-up, last year's "Such Jubilee."Since then they've steadily picked up speed and fans they've earned from long stretches on the road, including appearances at Newport Folk Festival, Austin City Limits Fest, and Telluride Bluegrass. It's been an auspicious journey for a pair who casually met at a bluegrass jam session in 2009.

"When we finished 'Such Jubilee,' I started writing these songs with a different goal in mind. I thought about how I would write songs for somebody else to record," Marlin explains. "I ended up with a bunch of songs like that, but we chose ones that I still felt personally connected to."

Holed up at the Rubber Room studio in Chapel Hill, N.C., with a full band this time around, they laid down the tracks in a week between touring. They've always been keen on the notion that drawn-out recording sessions don't necessarily yield better results. A good song, and just one good take, will always shine through any studio sorcery.

The passage of time, and the regret that often accompanies it, courses through these songs. "When did all the good times turn to hard lines on my face/ And lead me so far from my place right by your side?" Marlin ruminates on "My Blinded Heart."

In fact, there's heartache by the numbers on "Blindfaller." If you didn't know better, you'd swear "Picking Up Pieces" is a tearjerker George Jones or Willie Nelson sang back in the early 1970s. It's a Mandolin Orange original, of course, and also a poignant reminder of the economy and grace with which Marlin imbues his songs – say what's important and scrap the rest.

A country dirge with soulful washes of pedal steel and mandolin, "Wildfire" details the the lingering, present-day devastation of slavery and the Civil War, with Marlin's voice locking into close harmonies with Frantz on the chorus. "Take This Heart of Gold" opens with perhaps the best classic-country line you'll hear all year: "Take this heart of gold and melt it down." (Marlin admits it was inspired by a Tom Waits lyric he misheard.)

But there's also room for detours. Straight out of a honky tonk, "Hard Travelin'" lets the band shift into overdrive. A freewheeling ode to life on the road, it had been kicking around for a while but never fit on previous releases.

As for the album title, it's meant to evoke a sense of wonder, of contemplation. A "faller" is someone who fells trees, and in this case that person is blind to his/her own actions and those of the world. The spectral cover photo, by Scott McCormick, is open to interpretation, too: Either those trees are engulfed in flames or sunlight is pouring through them. It's up to you.

"We wanted different vibes and different intuitions on these tracks," Marlin says, "and I feel like we really captured that."

"When you're gone so much, you start realizing what you have and what's waiting for you," explains Marlin. "You realize this there's place to come back to at the end of the journey.

 The road has been good to Mandolin Orange since releasing This Side of Jordan. NPR called the album "effortless and beautiful," naming it one of the year's best folk/Americana releases, while Magnet dubbed it "magnificent." It earned them performances everywhere from the iconic Newport Folk Festival to Pickathon, as well as tours with Willie Watson, Gregory Alan Isakov, The Wood Brothers, and more.

For the Such Jubilee sessions, Marlin and Frantz set up facing each other in Asheville's Echo Mountain studio to capture the undeniable chemistry of their live performances. On "Settled Down," Marlin looks at what it takes to find that nearly-telepathic level of comfort in a relationship, while "Daylight" looks for peace in long-term companionship, and "That Wrecking Ball" meditates on the sometimes ravaging passage of time. Not all of the songs are purely introspective, though, as "Jump Mountain Blues" brings to life a haunting Native American legend, and the ambitious "Blue Ruin" was penned in response to the horrific violence at Sandy Hook.

Such Jubilee is a record about home, both the place and the idea. Some days it's a safe, warm, loving refuge from the world outside. Other days it's cold and empty and too quiet. Either way, it's always waiting for you at the end of the road.
Rachel Baiman
In many ways, Shame, the new album from 27-year-old Nashville
Americana songwriter and multi-instrumentalist Rachel Baiman, is an exploration of growing up female in America. “I wasn't necessarily trying to write songs that would be easy to listen to," Baiman says of the project, “I wanted to write about reality, in all of it's terror and beauty.” From the title track about abortion politics, to love, sex, and abuse in relationships, to classism and inequality in her re-write of Andy Irvine's working class anthem “Never Tire of the Road,” the album is ambitious in its scope, yet remains cohesive through Baiman's personal perspective. Despite the serious subject matter, the overall feeling of the album remains light, with the tongue-in-cheek “Getting Ready to Start (Getting Ready)” and feel-good anthem “Let them Go To Heaven." A departure from her stripped- down work with progressive folk duo 10 String Symphony, Shame is lush and varied in instrumentation and musical texture.
Inspired in equal parts by John Hartford and Courtney Barnett, Baiman's influences span a wide range, but years spent playing traditional music shine through in the album’s firmly rooted sound. For recording and production, Baiman turned to the talents of Mandolin Orange's Andrew Marlin. “At the time that I was writing the music for this record, I was listening to all North Carolina-made albums, including Mandolin Orange and the album Andrew produced for Josh Oliver (Oliver is also featured heavily on Shame)." Shortly after reaching out to Marlin, Baiman traveled to Chapel Hill, NC for three intensive days in the studio. "The energy was amazing," Baiman says. "It became clear that we were making something really special that needed to be finished.”
Added to the musical intensity was the context of the material they were recording—namely, how the songwriting on Shame sits within the current American political climate. "I think what is happening in the country right now has really shifted my career priorities, and brought the folk music community together. We are all suddenly seeing our purpose come into focus, and feeling a renewed responsibility to be a voice of unity and resistance.” In addition to the release of her new solo album, Baiman is the co-founder of a new political group called Folk Fights Back, a musician-led national organization that puts together benefit concerts and awareness events in response to the Trump administration.
Baiman is no newcomer to activism. Raised in Chicago by a radical economist and a social worker, she was surrounded by social justice issues her entire life. “If I wanted to rebel against my parents I could have become a finance banker or a corporate lawyer” she says of her childhood. While her classmates went to church or temple on Sunday mornings, Baiman attended the Ethical Humanist Society of Greater Chicago, a non-religious community formed around discussions of morality and current events. “That was always a tough one to explain at school” she says with a laugh.
As a teenager, Baiman found music to be a welcome escape from worrying about global politics. “I often found the constant discussion of seemingly unsolvable problems to be intense and overwhelming, and when I moved to Nashville to pursue music it felt like something positive, beautiful and productive that I could put into the world. Now that I've had some years to devote to music,”—Baiman has been recording and touring internationally for the past 4 years with 10 String Symphony, and has played fiddle for numerous other artists including Kacey Musgraves and Winnipeg folk band Oh My Darling—“I find it hard to escape from the values that I grew up with, and I feel compelled to write politically, to speak out about things that I've experienced or seen. Songwriting is a unique opportunity to do that, because it avails a more emotional vehicle for discussion. I love the political tradition of folk music, from Woody Guthrie to Tupac, and my hope is that this record adds another voice to it.”
Venue Information:
The Teragram Ballroom
1234 West 7th Street
Los Angeles, CA, 90017
http://www.teragramballroom.com/